Winchester College Festival of Physics, 9 July 2022

We are really looking forward to a physics filled day at Winchester College on Saturday 9th July. Below you can find the provisional programme for the day, with plenty of interesting workshops for you to choose from. The day will close with a keynote plenary session from Dr David Price, joining us from Diamond Light Source, the UK’s national synchrotron science facility.

We are delighted that the conference is fully funded, and so there will be no charge for you to attend.

9.30-10.30: Registration and networking in exhibition area

10.30-10.40: Welcome

10.50-11.50: Workshop 1

TitleFocusPresenterDescriptionBiography
1.1GCSE Required Practicals

(Repeating workshop)
KS4Ben FordA golden opportunity to try your hand at the AQA GCSE Physics required practicals and ask anything you like! There’ll be time to practise the set up, take some data and analyse it. Ben will share pedagogy ideas and classroom hacks for each, all with an aim to reduce the cognitive load for students. Ben Ford has taught Physics for ten years and is currently a Head of Department. He has worked with Physics Partnersfor the past six years, training teachers in subject knowledge and Physics pedagogy. He is currently also Head of Career and Higher Education so likes a good chat about that too!
1.2Royal Academy of Engineering Hive WorkshopKS4Laura WatfordThis workshop will explore the incredibly useful teaching tool that is a Hive device. This tiny tool is powered by a 3V button battery and can record and log data on a computer and give simple readings on the device. Laura will set up a few small practical tasks that you can explore and learn to use the Hive. The best bit is that you will receive a Hive resource pack to keep. These great little devices can also be used to deliver Required Practicals for GCSE.Laura Watford has led the RAEng CST Portsmouth network for 6 years and has more recently co founded STEMunity with her colleague Jorden Birch. Laura is passionate about embedding opportunities for Practical Learning linked to context in the curriculum. Laura recently joined the panel for Professor Bill Lucas’ latest RAEng Report: Reimaging Practical Learning in Secondary Schools
1.3ElectricityKS3 & KS4Dorian PascoeThis session explores ideas about electricity, focused mainly on KS3 and KS4. The session includes exciting demonstrations, fun experiments & practical activities, and ideas for using a range of free simulations and software effectively to help illustrate tricky concepts.Dorian has a background in science communication and has been teaching physics in secondary schools for 15 years. He is passionate about developing exciting practical work & demonstrations, and using IT to enhance students’ learning experiences. Dorian has experience delivering CPD for the Institute of Physics, the National Space Academy and STEM learning.
1.4Engaging families and young people with physics beyond the classroom.KS4 to Post-16Jess HamerThis session will explore how teachers and other school staff can engage with families and young people outside of the classroom. We will focus on how schools can support families to see physics as something that is possible for everyone to do. There will be tips on how best to engage parents and carers when talking about jobs that use physics skills and how extracurricular science and physics clubs can be made more inclusive.Jessica is the Influencing and Engagement Manager for the South of England region at the Institute of Physics. She is a former teacher and teacher trainer and has worked on numerous projects that explore the barriers young people face when it comes to physics education. She has a particular interest in the role parents and carers have in the subject choices young people make. She is also currently doing research on inclusion in computing education at King’s College London, as part of the SCARI Computing project.
1.5Thermal Physics: demonstrations and practicalsKS4 & Post 16Jamie BarronIn this session, we will look at a range of demonstrations and class practicals on the broad topic of thermal physics – from the low-tech (e.g. using analogue thermometers and readily available materials) to the high-tech (using data-loggers, thermal cameras, etc). Jamie has taught Physics at Winchester College for nine years. He has worked with Physics Partners delivering training sessions at Winchester since 2019, and has worked with CUP on an e-textbook project for the Pre-U Physics qualification. Before coming to Winchester, he was a research seismologist, working on computational data analysis to produce seismic velocity maps of the Earth’s upper mantle.
1.6Current affairsTechniciansPaul CookWe’ll be looking at simple circuitry for non-specialists and making the most of using a multi-meter – fault finding/ checking components

Paul is the Senior Lead Technician at ARK Burlington Danes Academy and Lead Technician for the Ark Academy network. He has a real passion for presenting demonstrations to help inspire and enthuse students by making scientific theory visible and understandable to all.
Paul is also a multi-award winning technician including a Rolls Royce Special Merit award for work with ICT in science lessons and schools, and the Wellcome Trust award as a National Expert STEM Technician.

12.00-1.00: Workshop 2


TitleFocusPresenterDescriptionBiography
2.1GCSE Required Practicals

(Repeating workshop)
KS4Ben FordA golden opportunity to try your hand at the AQA GCSE Physics required practicals and ask anything you like! There’ll be time to practise the set up, take some data and analyse it. Ben will share pedagogy ideas and classroom hacks for each, all with an aim to reduce the cognitive load for students. Ben Ford has taught Physics for ten years and is currently a Head of Department. He has worked with Physics Partnersfor the past six years, training teachers in subject knowledge and Physics pedagogy. He is currently also Head of Career and Higher Education so likes a good chat about that too!
2.2Electromagnetic Spear make’n’takeKS4 to Post-16Richard GrimmerThe Electromagnetic Spear is a physical model of the electric and magnetic fields in an EM wave. It is over a metre long, with the different fields represented by different coloured lobes. The spear helps to visualise the electric and magnetic field components along an EM wave, and associated effects such as polarisation, reflection, phase differences and coherence. It can also be hung from the ceiling or on a wall to make a permanent display. You will make a sturdy model from wood and corriflute (corrugated plastic sheet), provided free, to take away with you, with the instructions to make more and ideas for its use in class.Richard Grimmer has taught physics for over 20 years and worked as an IOP Physics Network Coordinator for 12 years. He has co-authored two KS3 Science textbooks and has contributed to an A Level textbook.
2.3Inclusion in the Physics ClassroomKS3 to Post-16Sarah CosgriffIn this session, we will discuss the importance of inclusion in the classroom and share inclusive teaching practice tips. Participants will also get the opportunity to reflect on their own teaching practice.Sarah Cosgriff is an Inclusion in Schools Consultant at the Association for Science Education. In her role, she helps support secondary schools to become more welcoming and inclusive places for pupils and address barriers that impact subject choice. She also works for Schools OUT UK, a LGBT+ education charity who aim to help make schools safe places for LGBT+ people.
2.4Galilean PhysicsKS4Jeremy DouglasGalileo Galilei (1564-1642) is perhaps most famous for featuring in the song “Bohemian Rhapsody” and for the controversies surrounding his support for the idea that the Earth orbits the Sun. But he pioneered important ideas in many areas of physics, many of which are key “penny drop” moments in an understanding of the subject and often very suitable for a KS4 class. From the Tower of Pisa to the telescope, weave some Galilean demonstrations and history into your GCSE Physics!Jeremy Douglas has taught Physics at Winchester College since 2004 and was Head of Physics for 14 years. He has a particular interest in Physics CPD and has worked with Physics Partners as a trainer on a variety of events.
2.5Teaching and Learning in the Physics Classroom: Low Stakes but desirable difficulty – How do we balance the two?KS3 to Post-16Kate BridgeThere is a real balance to creating something that is hard enough to challenge but low stakes enough that students feel confident to try. In this session Kate will share some of the methods she has tried in my classroom and why she views them as successful. Not rocket science by any means; they are tools available to us all.Dr Kate Bridge is Head of Physics at Haberdasher’s School for Girls, an independent school in Hertfordshire. She has 15 years teaching experience in both the state and private sector and 12 years’ experience as a middle manager. Kate is currently the Co-chair of the practitioners council for FED helping form a longer term plan for education. Her passion is teaching and learning and can be mostly be found combining her love of sport with her love of Physics.
2.6Working confidently with physics equipmentTechniciansPaul CookWe’ll be setting up common Physics demos – Oscilloscopes with a signal generator/ speaker & microphone (If you have an Oscilloscope and unsure how to set it up, bring it along) including standing waves.Paul is the Senior Lead Technician at ARK Burlington Danes Academy and Lead Technician for the Ark Academy network. He has a real passion for presenting demonstrations to help inspire and enthuse students by making scientific theory visible and understandable to all.
Paul is also a multi-award winning technician including a Rolls Royce Special Merit award for work with ICT in science lessons and schools, and the Wellcome Trust award as a National Expert STEM Technician.

1.00-2.00: Lunch, networking and optional tour of Winchester College

2.10-3.10: Workshop 3


TitleFocusPresenterDescriptionBiography
3.1GCSE Required Practicals

(Repeating workshop)
KS4Ben FordA golden opportunity to try your hand at the AQA GCSE Physics required practicals and ask anything you like! There’ll be time to practise the set up, take some data and analyse it. Ben will share pedagogy ideas and classroom hacks for each, all with an aim to reduce the cognitive load for students. Ben Ford has taught Physics for ten years and is currently a Head of Department. He has worked with Physics Partnersfor the past six years, training teachers in subject knowledge and Physics pedagogy. He is currently also Head of Career and Higher Education so likes a good chat about that too!
3.2Forces in FlightKS3 & KS4Richard BonellaSimple paper darts, made and tested by pupils, can provide an excellent context for developing ideas about forces.  This workshop will take a class through the steps of dropping paper to identify forces, then considering how these forces can be used for flight.  We’ll look at how Newton’s First, Second and Third Laws describe and predict what happens.  Moving on to controlled flight, we’ll introduce moments as turning forces.  We’ll conclude the physics by thinking about horizontal forces, and the purpose and function of aircraft engines in terms of forces.
Such a lesson could stand on its own at KS 3 or 4 (with a more mathematical approach for KS4), but might be followed by a school visit to an aircraft museum.  The workshop will end with a brief look at planning such a visit.
Richard Bonella: sometime RAF engineer, then physics teacher. No longer a full-time teacher, but enthusiastic supporter of medical imaging after two rounds of cardiac surgery.  Had a rather nomadic early life, now settled in Shropshire with wife and saluki.  Was a PNC and TLC for the IOP in past years, now working for PP in the West Midlands.  In other news, is a trustee and tour guide at the newly-restored Shrewsbury Flaxmill-Maltings, the world’s first iron-framed building!
3.3Salad Bowl Accelerator make’n’takeKS4 to Post-16Neal GuptaThe ‘accelerator bowl’ is a model of a circular particle accelerator that can be used to explain the workings of real machines like Diamond and the Large Hadron Collider.

Although it is a very simple model, by discussing the similarities and differences between this and a real accelerator, we can understand a lot of the Physics involved in these intriguing machines.  You will also build a model of a linear accelerator Both models can be taken away for you to use in the laboratory.

Neal has taught physics for 29 years and has been Head of Physics, STEM Coordinator and also Head of Sixth Form.  He has worked as a consultant for the Institute of Physics and Physics Partners, delivering CPD to specialists, non-specialists and technicians. Presently, he is a lecturer in  the School of Education at Nottingham Trent University.
3.4Waving not drowningKS3 & KS4Trevor PlantAn interactive and “hands-on” session looking at models, practicals, and acitivities we can use for teaching waves. We will discuss the most common misconceptions and how we can avoid them. There will be a few toys to play with too!After teaching for nearly 30 years, Trevor worked for the IOP for 12 supporting teachers of physics in workshops, summer schools, online videos and tutorials and 1-1 mentoring.
3.5The A-B-G of RadioactivityKS4 to Post-16Dario DuoThis session will include a quick revision of atomic structure and lead into why some nuclei are unstable and the channels by which they decay (alpha, beta and gamma).
We will discuss the characteristics of the three types of radiation and the balancing of decay equations. Half life will then be covered if time permits.
Dario has 10 years of experience teaching Physics in schools in and around London. He has been second in department and in charge of the Oxbridge preparation, and he has collaborated with Physics Partners on a number of occasions. He is currently teaching Physics at Westminster School.
3.6Spinning BeatsTechniciansPaul CookMaking motors – a chance to get those old Westminster kits to work and build homemade speakers. You’ll make own speaker from the various methods and resources available – How loud can you make it?!  A Great activity for anyone who runs STEM/Science clubs.

Paul is the Senior Lead Technician at ARK Burlington Danes Academy and Lead Technician for the Ark Academy network. He has a real passion for presenting demonstrations to help inspire and enthuse students by making scientific theory visible and understandable to all.
Paul is also a multi-award winning technician including a Rolls Royce Special Merit award for work with ICT in science lessons and schools, and the Wellcome Trust award as a National Expert STEM Technician.

3.15-4.15: Keynote session and raffle

Dr. David Price, Diamond Light Source (remote presentation)

Diamond is the UK’s national synchrotron.  It is similar in design to particle accelerators in places like CERN, however rather than being a collider, Diamond uses X-rays that are given off by of the accelerating electrons to study anything from fossils and jet engines to viruses and vaccines.  David will take us on a virtual tour of the facility, going into the accelerator and labs and describing the techniques used and some of the experiments carried out. He will also link the work done at Diamond to the areas studied in the classroom and show some of the real impact that studying STEM can have. David will also show some of the resources available to schools and answer your questions.

Dr David Price is the Public Engagement Manager at Diamond Light Source. For the past 16 years David has worked in public engagement of STEM including at Diamond, Thinktank Science Museum and running his own company. Before that David completed both a PhD in Nuclear Physics and PGCE in secondary science from Birmingham University and if you go far enough back he sold lasers.